Hardware Cologne

Upward trend and challenges ahead for the industry

Hallendurchblick, Halle 10.1

Many companies in the hardware and tools industry can look back at three positive quarters. In comparison to last year, a slight growth is visible almost everywhere. Many market players see the opportunity to continue this year’s upward trend through next year. To reach this goal, manufacturers and distributors will have to strengthen their own E-Commerce strategies if they don’t want to lose market shares to international online shops. read more…

German toolmakers export sales up

fwi

 

Last year German tool manufacturers sold products to the tune of 3.8 billion Euros – an increase of 1.4 percent on the previous year. And that, even though there was a general cooling of the economy in 2012, as reported by the German FWI Tool Trade Association. The traditionally healthy level of tool exports held up well in 2012, with export orders up by 1.8 percent on the previous year, though there was a later decline in the rate of growth. There was considerable variation in the markets. Tool exports to other European countries were down about 1.5 percent.  There was a sharp decline in sales to Greece (-19.9 %), Italy (- 12.5 %) and Spain (- 13 %), while sales were up in Russia (+ 18,2 %) and the USA (+ 12.9 %). At present, the USA is the biggest customer, accounting for 8.4 % of German tool exports in 2012. read more…

FWI Calls for Continued Effective Patent Laws in Germany

 

The FWI Toolmakers’ Association has criticised discussion on the proposed softening of German patent laws: “The discussion harms the interests of German tool and fixture manufacturers, their employees and end-users.” The Association points out that it is not only large corporations that benefit from patent rights; effective patent protection for products is also a vital lifeline for small and newly established businesses. The FWI chief executive Rainer Langelüddecke says: “Without such protection, innovative products would be immediately copied and introduced on a large scale, leaving smaller companies with no chance of growth or survival.” Small, innovative companies would be squashed by bigger companies, placing a brake on the design and development of new tools and fixtures.  read more…